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Stand-Up Comedy Experience

In the late 1980s/early 1990s, I participated in a workshop comedy group called The Stand-Up Comedy Experience, under the direction of the inestimable Steve Rosenfield. That workshop has grown and morphed and is now the American Comedy Institute. It was a hobby, that I briefly toyed with turning into something more, but, my creative talents lend themselves more to comedy writing, and to cooking, than to performing. Still, I had a hell of a lot of fun.

This clip also contains performances from two of my closest friends at the time, Maureen Morris and Eli Krupnik. Eli was the person who got me into the workshop in the first place. Sadly, he passed away in early 2014. The show was emceed by the inimitable (albeit slightly less campy than usual) Alan Sues, who also passed away, in 2011.

Material: Being Gay; Dating

Location: Don’t Tell Mama, New York City

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TMLP, The Leadership Weekend Skit

Improv skit (it really was, all we did was come up with the two main themes of the skit, during our lunch break before the afternoon session, and then we winged it from there) with myself and Eli Krupnik at the Team, Management & Leadership weekend in Atlanta, April 1989. Much of it is poking fun at, or parodying the leadership training weekend we were at – using a little humor to lighten up an intensive program. As such a lot of the references and choice of language probably won’t make much sense to people who haven’t participated in the program.

Sadly, Eli passed away in early 2014. He was the person who got me into the world of comedy, and comedy writing, and he is missed.

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In the Service

Emery
Issue 8, Volume VIII
April 2, 1976
pg. 2

In the Service

In less than three months, it will be commencement day for Huron High School Seniors. Many tend to think of commencement as the end of school days. But, even by its definition, commencement is the beginning. For 1976’s graduating class, we might ask the question: The beginning of what?

For some, commencement marks the beginning of another phase of their education. Maybe it’s college, or technical school. But for most, commencement marks the beginning of a working career. Where will this year’s graduates find their jobs? And what opportunities for the future will these jobs hold? These are difficult questions, but questions that require answers.

Far too often, the only jobs available to young people are jobs that are only a short road to nowhere. You deserve something better. And one place where you can get something better is in the all-volunteer Army.

Today’s Army has many programs some of which are described below:

Enlisted Men/Women

When you enlist you have many opportunities to do what you want. After Basic Training that everyone goes through, you are sent to the Service School of your choice; whether it’s Infantry, Military Police, Signal Corps, or whatever you want… but you have to work at it.

After you have your new skill, you can now pick which Army post you’d like to work at. If there’s an opening there, you’re on your way. If not, pick a second choice.

You can also enlist on the Delayed Entry Program, which means that from the date you enlist you have up to 9 months to report for basic training.

There is also the new Stripes for Skills program. If you have a special civilian learned skill that the Army can use, whether it’s flute player, cook, veterinarian’s assistant or any of over 50 possible fields, you could spend as little as 8 weeks in training and then start out as an Army Sergeant!

And for those of you who want to go to college, why not take advantage of the Army’s Project AHEAD. In this program you enlist in the Army and enroll in college at the same time. Then while working for the Army , you also attend classes right there on the base. The credits earned whil in the Army are then transferred back to whatever college you enrolled in, and counted toward a bachelor’s degree.

And one more thing, although you can’t get rich in the Army, you’ll be making good money. A Private starts out at $361.20 a month plus room and board. Or if you are promoted to Sergeant through the Stripes for Skills program, you’ll be starting out at $452.30 a month plus room and board.

Officer’s Programs

If you think you have the qualifications to be an officer in the US Army, you have basically three programs to choose from.

The first is the Reserve Officer’s Training Corpos (ROTC). If you plan to be attending college (4 yr. or 2 yr) you could be eligible for this program. Except for their military instruction, ROTC cadets attend the same classes and live the same life style as other students, including paritipation in extracurricular activities. And while you are in school the Army will pay you as much as $2500 during your Junior and Senior years. Or if you can earn an ROTC scholarship you could get all of your tuition, room and board, and $100 a month for up to 10 months a year for all four years of college.

The second program is West Point. You attend West Point as you would any college except for the addition of military life on campus. West Point is free too, if you get accepted. You have to be in top shape, both physically and mentally to make it in, and to stay in. But if you make it, it’s worth it… a free college education and your Army commission.

The third program is Officer’s Candidate School (OCS). There are several ways to get into OCS. If you go to college first, you can enlist into this program instead of enlisting as a Private. Or go to a two year college, enlist, and after a year or two of service apply for the school. The third way is to enlist, serve for five or six years (at least) and then apply for the school.

And one more benefit, after any of these commissioning programs you will be a second lieutenant… with at least $666 a month plus room and board.

The Ary offers many job-training courses, an excellent salary and fine living conditions. It also offers a benefit that’s impossible to price. Not just a job, but a job with dignity.

For more information contact Mike Stewart, 665-3731 or drop in and see him at 212 S. Fourth Ave., Ann Arbor. If you’re interested in the ROTC program contact Colonel Parker, 764-2400.


It probably seems silly to include a few pieces from my high school newspaper, but hey, it’s where I got my start writing, so why not?

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Forensics Team Shows ‘Em’

Emery
Issue 7, Volume VIII
March 4, 1976
pg. 1

Forensics Team Shows ‘Em’

High Quality. That’s what the sponsors of a Forensics conference in Gatlinburg, Tennessee said about Huron’s Forensics team. Six students along with Mrs. Kreger spent five days competing against the 53 best High School Forensics teams in the south.

The students: Dan Leach, Patty Woolley, Karin Schmidt, Dave Manis, Becca Stucki and Wendy Ward spent three days of competition, sometimes till 11:00 at night. Every one of them had at least one round of perfect scores. They competed in categories that don’t even exist in Michigan Forensics. In the Interp category, Becca was semi-finalists and Patty was a finalist. Patty won a 4-year scholarship to the sponsoring college for her excellent speaking. Dave and Karin were highest from Huron with a 4th place in Duet Acting.

When they weren’t competing, the students spent their time enjoying the 70° weather as they thought of us back here in Michigan. They enjoyed everything from a 4-mile cable car ride to playing Tank (Ask them.).

One thing that they especially enjoyed was the southern hospitality which really does still exist. Another thing was the low prices which helped considerably as the students paid for this trip out of their own pockets.

Ms. Kreger said, “This was the best competition we’ve ever been in, and one of the best trips I’ve ever been on.”


It probably seems silly to include a few pieces from my high school newspaper, but hey, it’s where I got my start writing, so why not?

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Editorial

The Public Eye
No. 3
October 31, 1975
pg. 1

Editorial

There is a lot of talk going around about the upcoming millage election. Although many people seem to know what’s going on, do you?

IN the last five years State Aid has dropped from nearly $4,000,000 to nothing, inflation has lowered the purchasing power of the dollar by 40¢, and due to a new tax law the school system will be losing $1,600,000 per year.

Because of several state and federal laws, some of ths money must be used for faculty unemployment compensation, special education, health and safety regulations, and equal extracurricular activities for girls.

Despite this the School Board has managed to provide many things, including transportation for 4200 students and the reestablishment of the summer school programs.

In the next three years the present revenue coming into the school system will fall $5,000,000 short of anticipated expenditures. A millage increase of 2 mills will bring approximately $5,000,000 to the school system. This money if collected cannot be used for teacher salary negotiations.

If this 2 mill increase is not passed for the next two years, there will be a 4 mill increase next year. This second possibility would result in taxpayers paying $2,000,000 more than if the 2 mill plan is passed.

Also if the increase is not approved the school system may have to decrease faculty by approximately 150 staff, both vocal and instrumental music, co-curricular activities, and elective courses.

The cost of this increase to the homeowner will be approximately one-teth of one percent of the value of his/her home ($30 on a $30,000 home, etc.).

If you are 18 or older and have not registered to vote, please do so. Then November 4th, go and vote in favor of the 2 mill increase for your sake and others.


The Public Eye was an “underground” newpaper produced by “the students of Ann Arbor High Schools. Basically, it was the non-authorized, free paper, produced by a couple of people who I came to know (and am actually still in touch with one) from the three different high schools in town. I only wrote one piece for them as far as I know – I think I helped more with things like layout.

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Who’s Getting the Scholarships?

Emery
Issue 9, Volume VI
June 5, 1975
pg. 2

Who’s Getting the Scholarships?

Have you ever wondered why some people get scholarships and others don’t? The typical answer is that the students who do well in school get them, and those who are just average or worse don’t.

Before you accept this answer as the truth, take a look at the people who get scholarships. To do this, divide them into three categories – upper, middle, and lower class.

First, the upper class. These are usually people who don’t need scholarships because of their financial situation. Sure some of them would like one and some of them get one, but it is a very small percentage.

Second, the lower class. Most of the time someone in this financial situation can get a scholarship, just out of need. This very often happens whether they do well in school or not.

Last, middle class. Includes the majority of us. Our financial situation is not so desperate, that we absolutely need a scholarship, but it could set us back quite a bit. A middle class person seems to be the only who has to work hard to get a scholarship.

Of course there are other factors which enter into the selection such as being a member of a minority group, or doing something which is considered a great accomplishment, and possibly even having an influential relative might help.


It probably seems silly to include a few pieces from my high school newspaper, but hey, it’s where I got my start writing, so why not?

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Students Tour USSR

Emery
Issue VII, Volume VI
April 25, 1975
pg. 1

Students Tour USSR

On Friday, March 28, 21 students, 2 chaperones, and 10 other adults from both Huron and Pioneer, left for the Soviet Union. We spent over 24 hours getting to our hotel in Kiev.

Kiev is the capital city of the Ukraine, which is one of 15 republics in the Soviet Union. We got about five hours of sleep and then started our first tour. We first took a general tour of the city and then in the afternoon visited a monastery and a church – St. Sofia. After dinner we had free time to walk around the streets which are extremely safe compared to ours. We were allowed to stay out as late as we wanted as long as we checked in at about 11 p.m. We left at 5 a.m. for Leningrad.

Leningrad is the second largest city in the Soviet Union and is located in the part of the country known as the Russian Federation. We spent our time visiting various churches and parks and the Hermitage. The Hermitage is one of the world’s largest art museums. It is made up of four buildings, one of which is the former Winter Palace of the Czars. One of the evenings that were there we went to the Leningrad circus. I thought it was one of the best circuses I had ever seen. Another evening about 18 of us went to one of Russia’s fanciest restaurants – the Arabat. This was a four course meal with everything from caviar and champagne to ice cream sundaes.

After four days in Leningrad, we went to Moscow. Our hotel, the National, is normally only for VIPs and is right across from the Kremlin. The Kremlin is the Russian equivalent of our Capitol and White House. Most of our touring was done in the Kremlin.

One evening we went to see the opera “Madame Butterfly.”

The two chaperones, Mrs. Carol Billings and Miss Jean Daniels said they felt the trip was a success and that most people along had a good time.


It probably seems silly to include a few pieces from my high school newspaper, but hey, it’s where I got my start writing, so why not?

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Officer is Busy Woman

Emery
Issue VI, Volume VI
March 21, 1975
pg. 3

Officer is Busy Woman

When Officer Tanya Padgett joined the Ann Arbor police force, she spent about two years on “limited duty,” writing tickets. When Michigan opened up its ranks to policewomen. Officer Padgett was one of three women selected to go to the academy. She then spent three years on Road Patrol, before transferring here to Huron in 1973. Now she’s our very own school police officer.

Officer Padgett covers all criminal offenses that happen on school property. She also helps people with problems they have. She says that this month assaults are down, but “The number one problem is larceny, especially from locker break-ins.”

There are two main problems Officer Padgett says she faces. The first is that a lot of people seem to think of police officers as ‘boogiemen.’ The second is a bit more serious. Many people are taking the five dollar ticket for possession of marijuana as if its nothing more than a traffic ticket. Officer Padgett says that this is not true. If you are under 17 it also goes on your juvenile record. If you are 17 or older it goes down on your records as ‘arrested for drug possession.’

Officer Padgett’s job is anything but routine. There is no set pattern to where her rounds take her.

“I play it by ear. Wherever there seems to be a problem, I go.”

When she has to arrest someone, she reports what happened to the person’s class principal, then their parents and last to the police department. Once a month she makes out a report about what has happened during the whole month.

Officer Padgett is married, has a nine year old son, and is attending Eastern Michigan University as a senior, majoring in Early Education.


It probably seems silly to include a few pieces from my high school newspaper, but hey, it’s where I got my start writing, so why not?

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Creativeness Back

Emery
Issue VI, Volume VI
March 21, 1975
pg. 1

Creativeness Back

The Huron High Creative Arts Festival will be held in the cafeteria from 2 till 6 on March 21st.

Seventh hour classes will not be held so that all students will be able to attend.

The program will include: student films, drama presentations, folk dancing, karate demonstrations, gymnastics, a jazz band, poetry readings, forensics readings, and a mime presentation. Food will be served by the International Club. A chess master will play chess games against any challengers, all at the same time.

The Creative Arts festival will be followed by a stupendous spaghetti dinner, complete with entertainment. The entertainment will be a preview of an exciting new play written, produced and performed by the Full Circle prose staff.

This year’s festival promises to be bigger and better than ever before, so be certain to attend and get cultured.


It probably seems silly to include a few pieces from my high school newspaper, but hey, it’s where I got my start writing, so why not?

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Chess Club Now Playing

Emery
Issue V, Volume VI
February 21, 1975
pg. 2

Chess Club Now Playing

The Huron High Chess Club met this fall on Thursday afternoons up till the time of the first state tournament held in Mondroe, Michigan in mid-November. The club had planned to participate but first had to pay membership dues to the State and National Chess Associations. The school was willing to pay part, but due to lack of funds the members were unable to pay the rest.

Hopes are high for entering the tournament next year, particularly if it is held in Ann Arbor.

If anyone’s interested in playing a game, just contact Mr. Robert Hubbard in Room 5201.


It probably seems silly to include a few pieces from my high school newspaper, but hey, it’s where I got my start writing, so why not?

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